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Returning to Work After Mild Stroke

      Nearly half of all strokes are considered mild strokes.
      • Wolf T.J.
      • Baum C.
      • Conner L.T.
      Changing face of stroke: implications for occupational therapy practice.
      Even though people with mild stroke may have minimal or no difficulty with everyday tasks like getting dressed or following a morning routine, they may have greater difficulty with more complex everyday activities like returning to work.
      • Hu X.
      • Heyn P.C.
      • Schwartz J.
      • Roberts P.
      • Johnston M.
      • Gilbody S.
      What is mild stroke?.
      Although mild stroke affects each person differently, many people report some changes in their ability to:
      • move arms and hands quickly and with good coordination
      • move legs and feet quickly and with good coordination
      • think quickly and clearly
        • Hartke R.J.
        • Trierweiler R.
        Survey of survivors’ perspective on return to work after stroke.
        • Kauranen T.
        • Turunen K.
        • Laari S.
        • Mustanoja S.
        • Baumann P.
        • Poutiainen E.
        The severity of cognitive deficits predicts return to work after a first-ever ischaemic stroke.
        • Moran G.M.
        • Fletcher B.
        • Feltham M.G.
        • Calvert M.
        • Sackley C.
        • Marshall T.
        Fatigue, psychological and cognitive impairment following transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke: a systematic review.
      • see clearly
      • speak and/or understand information
      • maintain physical and mental energy and stamina
        • Hartke R.J.
        • Trierweiler R.
        • Bode R.
        Critical factors related to return to work after stroke: a qualitative study.
      • manage emotions
        • Hartke R.J.
        • Trierweiler R.
        Survey of survivors’ perspective on return to work after stroke.
        • Moran G.M.
        • Fletcher B.
        • Feltham M.G.
        • Calvert M.
        • Sackley C.
        • Marshall T.
        Fatigue, psychological and cognitive impairment following transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke: a systematic review.
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        What is mild stroke?.
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        The severity of cognitive deficits predicts return to work after a first-ever ischaemic stroke.
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