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Electrical Stimulation Exercise Recommendations for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

  • Author Footnotes
    # both the first and the second authors contributed equally to the work
    David R. Dolbow
    Footnotes
    # both the first and the second authors contributed equally to the work
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy and College of Osteopathic Medicine, William Carey University, Hattiesburg, MS, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    # both the first and the second authors contributed equally to the work
    Ashraf S. Gorgey
    Correspondence
    Corresponding Author: Ashraf S. Gorgey, MPT, PhD, FACSM, FACRM, Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, Spinal Cord Injury & Disorders Service, 1201 Broad Rock Blvd, Richmond, VA 23249, USA, Phone: (804) 675-5000 ext. 3386
    Footnotes
    # both the first and the second authors contributed equally to the work
    Affiliations
    Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA

    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
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  • Tommy W. Sutor
    Affiliations
    Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA
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  • Kristin Musselman
    Affiliations
    KITE, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Canada

    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

    Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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  • Vanesa Bochkezanian
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise & Health Sciences, School of Health, Medical & Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia
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  • Glen M Davis
    Affiliations
    Discipline of Exercise and Sports Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • Author Footnotes
    # both the first and the second authors contributed equally to the work
Published:January 25, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2022.11.017
      Electrical stimulation activities have been used for decades to promote improved health and functional abilities for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). For example, electrical stimulation has been used to help improve muscle strength and size for individuals with muscle paralysis from SCI.1 The two primary types of electrical stimulation therapies that work on skeletal muscles are 1) functional electrical stimulation (FES) and 2) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES).
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