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LETTER TO THE EDITOR on “Thoracic Manual TherapyImproves Pain andDisability in Individuals with ShoulderImpingement Syndrome Compared with Placebo: A Randomized Controlled Trial with One-YearFollow-up.”

  • Taeheon Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Min Suk Choi
    Affiliations
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang, Republic of Korea
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  • Kiyeun Nam
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Kiyeun Nam, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Republic of Korea, Dongguk University International Hospital, Dongguk Street 27, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea, Post code: 10326, Tel: 82-31-961-8460; FAX: 82-31-961-7488
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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Published:January 14, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2022.11.016
      Shoulder pain is one of the common musculoskeletal condition we often encounter and study, and various analyses of its prevalence have been conducted.1 Because various approaches to the treatment of such condition is interesting, we read the study by Hunter et al.2 with great enthusiasm. Though there were several studies that previously investigated the relationship between thoracic manual therapy and shoulder impingement syndrome, they have limitations, in that the follow-up period was short. In contrast, Hunter et al. confirmed that the muscle energy technique (MET) was effective in reducing disability and pain for up to one year after end of treatment; however, in order for this study to become more valuable, some major concerns should be addressed.
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