Advertisement

Towards the consistent inclusion of people with aphasia in stroke research irrespective of discipline

  • Ciara Shiggins
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Dr. Ciara Shiggins, Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Melbourne, 3086, Australia.
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

    Queensland Aphasia Research Centre, Brisbane, Australia

    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

    School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK
    Search for articles by this author
  • Brooke Ryan
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    University of Technology Sydney, Graduate School of Health, Clinical Psychology, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia

    Speech Pathology, Curtin School of Allied Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Robyn O'Halloran
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Emma Power
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    University of Technology Sydney, Graduate School of Health, Speech Pathology, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Julie Bernhardt
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    Director, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence Stroke Rehabilitation and Brain Recovery & Co-Head of Stroke Theme, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Richard. I. Lindley
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    Westmead Applied Research Centre; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney
    Search for articles by this author
  • Gordon McGurk
    Affiliations
    Chairperson, Human Research Ethics Committee, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital

    Chairperson, Human Research Ethics Committee A, University of Queensland

    Member, Human Research Ethics Committee, Townsville Hospital and Health Service

    Director, OmniAdvisory Consulting
    Search for articles by this author
  • Graeme. J. Hankey
    Affiliations
    Professor of Neurology, Medical School, Faculty of Health & Medical Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Miranda. L. Rose
    Affiliations
    Centre of Research Excellence in Aphasia Recovery and Rehabilitation, Australia

    School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
    Search for articles by this author

      Abstract

      People with aphasia have been systematically excluded from stroke research or included without the necessary modifications, threatening external study validity. In this paper, we propose that 1) the inclusion of people with aphasia should be considered as standard in stroke research irrespective of discipline and that 2) modifications should be made to stroke research procedures to support people with aphasia to achieve meaningful and valid inclusion. We argue that outright exclusion of this heterogenous population from stroke research based purely on a diagnosis of aphasia is rarely required and present a rationale for deliberate inclusion of people with aphasia in stroke research. The purpose of this paper is fourfold; 1) to highlight the issue and implications of excluding people with aphasia from stroke research; 2) to acknowledge the current barriers to including people with aphasia in stroke research; 3) to provide stroke researchers with methods to enable inclusion, including recommendations, resources, and guidance; and 4) to consider research needed to develop aphasia inclusive practices in stroke research.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect