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Return to Work for People With Aphasia

Published:April 05, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2021.12.020
      Right now, about 2.5 million people in the United States are living with aphasia after stroke.

      Simmons-Mackie N. Aphasia in North America. [white paper]. Available at:https://www.aphasiaaccess.org/white-papers/. Accessed October 31, 2020.

      Aphasia can make it difficult to talk, listen, read, and/or write. Stroke is the most common cause of aphasia, but it can also happen after a traumatic brain injury (eg, blow to the head), a brain tumor, brain infection, or a neurodegenerative disease (eg, Alzheimer's dementia).

      National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. What is aphasia?—Types, causes and treatment. Available at: https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/aphasia. Accessed October 30, 2020.

      Many people with aphasia are of working age, and this number is going up as more young people in the United States are sustaining stroke.
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      References

      1. Simmons-Mackie N. Aphasia in North America. [white paper]. Available at:https://www.aphasiaaccess.org/white-papers/. Accessed October 31, 2020.

      2. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. What is aphasia?—Types, causes and treatment. Available at: https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/aphasia. Accessed October 30, 2020.

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