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Benefits of exergame training for female patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Published:January 13, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2021.10.022

      Abstract

      Objective

      The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of exergame training on female patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), and outcome measurements mainly include overall functioning, pain perception, quality of life, exercise capacity, health perception, kinesiophobia and fatigue severity.

      Data Sources

      Five electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, PsycInfo, Scopus, and Cochrane Library) were searched from inception until June 24, 2021. In addition to search reviewing the reference lists of relevant papers by hand. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate the risk of bias in the included studies.

      Study Selection

      Articles were collected with the following study inclusion criteria: (1) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) design. (2) participants were female patients with FMS aged > 18 years. (3) participants from experiments groups received exergame training using any modality. And (4) outcome measures include overall functioning, quality of life, exercise capacity, health perception, kinesiophobia and fatigue severity.

      Data Synthesis

      Nine randomized controlled trials, including 466 female patients with FMS, were included in the analysis. Exergame training had significant positive effects on overall functioning (standardized mean difference [SMD] = −0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.77 to 0.27; p < .0001), pain perception (SMD = −0.49; 95% CI = −0.97 to −0.02; p = .04), quality of life (SMD = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.44 to1.10; p < .00001), exercise capacity (SMD = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.32 to 0.84; p < .0001), health perception (SMD = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.38 to 1.01; p < .0001), and fatigue severity (SMD = −0.97; 95% CI = −1.55 to −0.38; p = .001). However, exergame training did not have significant effects on kinesiophobia (SMD = −1.13; 95% CI = −2.88 to 0.62; p = .21) .

      Conclusions

      Exergame training has beneficial effects on the overall functioning, pain perception, quality of life, exercise capacity, health perception and fatigue severity of female patients with FMS. Exergame training is a potential non-drug therapy for the treatment of patients with FMS.

      Key Words

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