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Supportive Communication for Individuals with Aphasia

      Aphasia is a language disorder that affects speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Aphasia is most commonly caused by a stroke or injury to the left side of the brain. Brain tumors and other neurologic diseases can also cause aphasia. Because of language impairments, individuals with aphasia struggle to participate in daily life activities involving communication in health care settings, at home, or in their community.
      • Simmons-Mackie N
      Aphasia in North America. Moorestown: Aphasia Access.
      People with aphasia and their communication partners can use supportive strategies to help them communicate in daily life.
      • Kagan A
      Supported conversation for adults with aphasia: methods and resources for training conversation partners.
      ,
      • Kagan A
      • Black SE
      • Duchan JF
      • Simmons-Mackie N
      • Square P
      Training volunteers as conversation partners using supported conversation for adults with aphasia (SCA): a controlled trial.
      A communication partner is anyone with whom the person with aphasia communicates.
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      References

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        Aphasia in North America. Moorestown: Aphasia Access.
        2018
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        Supported conversation for adults with aphasia: methods and resources for training conversation partners.
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        Training volunteers as conversation partners using supported conversation for adults with aphasia (SCA): a controlled trial.
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