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Commentary on the Challenges and Benefits of Implementing Standardized Outcome Measures

  • John F. Butzer
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author John F. Butzer, MD, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital and Michigan State University, John F. Butzer Center for Research and Innovation, 235 Wealthy St SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49301.
    Affiliations
    John F. Butzer Center for Research and Innovation, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan

    Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Roberta Virva
    Affiliations
    John F. Butzer Center for Research and Innovation, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan

    Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Lauren Lenca
    Affiliations
    John F. Butzer Center for Research and Innovation, Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan

    Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 25, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2020.10.132

      Abstract

      The Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) has proposed a Learning Heath system (LHS) as a model to improve health care. A LHS focuses on capturing data from the clinical encounter and applying those data to improve practice. The process can be described as an iterative learning cycle composed of 3 areas: performance to data, data to knowledge, and knowledge to performance or often knowledge translation. Adoption of new knowledge in medicine is notoriously slow, and the relatively new field of knowledge translation is systematically examining the critical success factors. In this issue of the Archives, Moore reports a knowledge translation project in a key aspect of rehabilitation: implementing standardized outcome measures. We report on the challenges and benefits of that project from a practical perspective and identify the critical success ingredient, leadership for implementation, which was composed of 3 key behaviors: setting clear expectations, engaging stakeholders, and providing support. Furthermore, the additional benefits, challenges, and costs are addressed.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      Co-PI (coprincipal investigator), EMR (electronic medical record), GAB (gait assessment battery), KT (knowledge translation), LHS (learning health system), MFB (Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital), OT (occupational therapist), PT (physical therapist), RA (research assistant), SNF (skilled nursing facility)
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