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Rapid Yet Thorough Bedside Assessment of Eye-Hand Coordination

Published:December 09, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2020.10.109
      Eye-hand coordination (EHC) is critical for activities of daily living. EHC is dependent on the integrity of multiple brain systems and therefore is often disrupted by central nervous system pathology. Impairments can occur in ocular motor, manual motor, or ocular-manual motor control, that is, eye, hand, or EHC. Impaired EHC affects visually guided actions, such as reaching, grasping, wielding tools, and manipulating objects. This is true in acute pathologies, such as stroke and neurotrauma, as well as more chronic neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson disease.
      • Cano S.J.
      • Hobart J.C.
      • Hart P.E.
      • Korlipara L.V.P.
      • Schapira A.H.V.
      • Cooper J.M.
      International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS): appropriate for studies of Friedreich's ataxia?.
      • Kim B.R.
      • Lim J.H.
      • Lee S.A.
      • et al.
      Usefulness of the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) in ataxic stroke patients.
      • Perenin M.T.
      • Vighetto A.
      Optic ataxia: a specific disruption in visuomotor mechanisms. I. Different aspects of the deficit in reaching for objects.
      • Andersen R.A.
      • Andersen K.N.
      • Hwang E.J.
      • Hauschild M.
      Optic ataxia: from Balint's syndrome to the parietal reach region.
      • Rodrigues M.R.M.
      • Slimovitch M.
      • Chilingaryan G.
      • Levin M.F.
      Does the Finger-to-Nose Test measure upper limb coordination in chronic stroke?.
      Despite its clinical relevance, EHC is not often systematically assessed. Using 3 simple measures (fig 1), health care providers may rapidly identify and characterize deficits in EHC while also assessing visual function and eye and limb movement.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Fig 1Flow diagram for rapid eye-hand coordination assessment. Examiner performs three assessments finger-to-nose, finger-to-knee, and finger chase. Finger-to-nose is performed with targets in both central and peripheral vision; if deficits are noted, tests are repeated by providing proprioceptive ± audio feedback.
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