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Response by Xie et al to Letter Regarding Article “Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Gait and Freezing of Gait in Parkinson Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”

  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Xie and Gao contributed equally to this work.
    Yun-Juan Xie
    Footnotes
    ∗ Xie and Gao contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China
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  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Xie and Gao contributed equally to this work.
    Qiang Gao
    Footnotes
    ∗ Xie and Gao contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Key Laboratory of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China
    Search for articles by this author
  • Cheng-Qi He
    Affiliations
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Key Laboratory of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China
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  • Rong Bian
    Affiliations
    Department of Rehabilitation, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China
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  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Xie and Gao contributed equally to this work.
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      Linked Article

      • Optimizing Noninvasive Stimulation to Treat Gait Problems in Parkinson Disease
        Archives of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationVol. 101Issue 6
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          We read with great interest the study from Xie et al1 on the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on gait and freezing of gait (FoG) in Parkinson disease (PD). The authors showed that rTMS can reduce the walking performance in individuals with PD during the short-term, but has no major effect in the long-term. Additionally, the difference between rTMS and no intervention in the scores of the FoG and timed Up and Go test were reported to be insignificant. Given that gait problems can be resistant to levodopa and directly affect the quality of life in PD, this review is timely because transcranial magnetic stimulation is increasingly implicated in a growing list of neurologic disorders.
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