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Treating Military-Connected Children in the Civilian Sector: Information and Resources for Health Care Providers

Published:February 10, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2019.12.003
      More than 50% of those currently serving in the armed forces are married with families. Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan more than 2.1 million military-connected children have had a parents deployed.
      • Obama B.
      Strengthening our military families: meeting America’s commitment.
      Many of these children have made tremendous sacrifices to support their parents. As a result, they are exposed to stressors related to their parents’ military service. These stressors can affect their overall physical, psychological, and behavioral health and lead to toxic stress.
      • Gorman G.H.
      • Eide M.
      • Hisle-Gorman E.
      Wartime military deployment and increased pediatric mental and behavioral health complaints.
      Military-connected children also develop tremendous resiliency when their needs are adequately addressed. It is the time for health care providers to join forces with military families to mitigate the effect of parental military service on military-connected children.
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