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Does Intermittent Catheterization Result in Fewer Infections Than Indwelling?

      I admire the commitment of researchers and clinicians at the Victorian Spinal Cord Service in their strong effort to improve bladder health among patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI).
      • May Goodwin D.
      • Brock J.
      • Dunlop S.
      • et al.
      Optimal bladder management following spinal cord injury: evidence, practice and a cooperative approach driving future directions in Australia.
      During training, most of us learned that SCI patients suffer more urinary tract infections (UTIs) with indwelling urethral catheters (IUCs) than with intermittent catheterization (IC). Nonetheless, a review of the literature will show many studies that fail to demonstrate a difference in UTI risk between the 2 methods. Why do we see some studies demonstrating a large difference in UTI risk while others fail to detect any difference? The answer may lie in the field of SCI immunology.
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      References

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