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Strategies to Cope With Behavior Changes After Acquired Brain Injury

      Behavior changes are common after acquired brain injury (ABI) because the brain processes information differently after the injury. About 62% of people with ABI experience behavior changes.
      • Stefan A.
      • Mathe J.F.
      SOFMER Group
      What are the disruptive symptoms of behavioral disorders after traumatic brain injury? A systematic review leading to recommendations for good practices.
      For some people with ABI, the changes in behavior have a major effect on their daily lives, while for others they may be relatively small. These changes can make daily tasks and social interactions difficult. People with ABI may be more sensitive to stress and fatigue, which can make the behaviors described in this article worse. It is important to understand why people with ABI might act differently and how to deal with them. This article provides strategies to help people with ABI and their care partners cope with changes in behavior.
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      Reference

        • Stefan A.
        • Mathe J.F.
        • SOFMER Group
        What are the disruptive symptoms of behavioral disorders after traumatic brain injury? A systematic review leading to recommendations for good practices.
        Ann Phys Rehabil Med. 2016; 59: 5-17