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Interrater Reliability of Activity Questionnaires After an Intensive Motor-Skill Learning Intervention for Children With Cerebral Palsy

Published:February 18, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.12.039

      Highlights

      • Activity questionnaires seem reliable in the usual rehabilitation context.
      • Activity questionnaires seem less reliable after motor-skill learning therapy.
      • A goal-directed process seems to influence the parent’s perception of activity changes.
      • Home-videotaped items are recommended after motor-skill learning therapy.

      Abstract

      Objective

      To investigate the reliability of parents-reported activity questionnaires after a motor-skill learning intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). We hypothesize that the intervention process might influence parental judgment.

      Design

      Double-blind randomized trial.

      Setting

      Conventional therapy was delivered in the usual context while intensive intervention was provided at the Catholic University of Louvain.

      Participants

      Children with CP (N=41; age range 5-18y, Gross Motor Function Classification System I-IV) were randomized to a control group (CG) (n=21, 2 dropouts) receiving conventional therapy or an intervention group (IG) (n=20) receiving hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy—including lower extremities (HABIT-ILE).

      Interventions

      Conventional therapy (mostly neurodevelopmental) was delivered as ongoing treatment (1-5 times/wk). HABIT-ILE, based on motor-skill learning, was delivered over 2 weeks. All children were assessed at T1 (baseline), T2 (3wk after baseline) and T3 (4mo after baseline).

      Main Outcomes Measures

      ABILHAND-Kids and ACTIVLIM-CP questionnaires rated by parents (perception) and 2 examiners (videotapes).

      Results

      Agreement (level/range) between examiners was systematically almost perfect (P≤.001). At baseline, moderate to almost perfect agreement (level/range) was observed between parents and examiners (P≤.001). At T2 and T3, a similar agreement (level/range) was observed for the CG. For the IG, a similar level of agreement was observed, but the range of agreement varied from poor to almost perfect (P≤.001), with parents estimating higher performance measures compared to examiners after intervention. Higher performance was associated with higher satisfaction scores of the child’s functional goals at T3.

      Conclusion

      Parents and examiners have a similar perception of the child’s performance at baseline and during conventional therapy. Their perceptions are less congruent after a motor-skill learning intervention, probably due to the goal-oriented process of the intervention. Therefore, our results favor the use of blind observations of home-videotaped items after intensive motor-skill learning interventions.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      CG (control group), CI (confidence interval), COPM (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure), CP (cerebral palsy), E1 (examiner 1), E2 (examiner 2), GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System), HABIT-ILE (hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy—including lower extremities), ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient), IG (intervention group), MACS (Manual Ability Classification System)
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