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Reducing the Effects of Hospital-Associated Deconditioning: Postacute Care Treatment Options for Patients and Their Caregivers

Published:December 05, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.09.116
      Hospital-associated deconditioning refers to generalized weakness or loss of fitness because of muscle nonuse, which can happen due to bed rest and inactivity during hospitalization for an illness.

      Deconditioning. Medical Dictionary. (2009). Available at: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/deconditioning. Accessed January 14, 2017.

      Deconditioning can have far-reaching effects on areas such as strength, physical endurance, heart rate, and circulation.

      Deconditioning. Medical Dictionary. (2009). Available at: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/deconditioning. Accessed January 14, 2017.

      • Kortebein P.
      Rehabilitation for hospital-associated deconditioning.
      • Gill T.M.
      • Allore H.
      • Guo Z.
      The deleterious effects of bed rest among community-living older persons.
      • Kortebein P.
      • Symons T.B.
      • Ferrando A.
      • et al.
      Functional impact of 10 days of bed rest in healthy older adults.
      • Bleeker M.W.
      • De Groot P.C.
      • Rongen G.A.
      • et al.
      Vascular adaptation to deconditioning and the effect of an exercise countermeasure: results of the Berlin Bed Rest study.
      These effects can make it harder for you to participate in physical and social activities the way you once could.
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      References

      1. Deconditioning. Medical Dictionary. (2009). Available at: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/deconditioning. Accessed January 14, 2017.

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        Functional impact of 10 days of bed rest in healthy older adults.
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        • Bleeker M.W.
        • De Groot P.C.
        • Rongen G.A.
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        Vascular adaptation to deconditioning and the effect of an exercise countermeasure: results of the Berlin Bed Rest study.
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