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Treating Military Service Members and Veterans in the Private Sector: Information and Resources for Clinicians

Published:October 25, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.06.006
      Since the onset of military action in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 2 million service members have deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn. These veterans join the more than 18.4 million veterans living in communities across the United States who have served in conflicts dating back to World War II. Many veterans have paid the price for their service. While the veteran population is resilient, it is also considered a vulnerable and underserved population.
      • Newport F.
      In U.S., 24% of men, 2% of women are veterans.

      Rossiter AG, Morrison-Beedy D, Capper T, D’Aoust RF. Meeting the needs of the 21st century veteran: development of an evidence-based online veteran health care course. J Prof Nursing; in press.

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