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Questionable Conclusions About Locomotor Training

      Morrison et al
      • Morrison S.A.
      • Lorenz D.
      • Eskay C.P.
      • Forrest G.F.
      • Basso D.M.
      Longitudinal recovery and reduced costs after 120 sessions of locomotor training for motor incomplete spinal cord injury.
      argue that 120 sessions of locomotor training (LT) reduce health care expenditures and improve function and physiology among participants with ASIA Impairment Scale grade C and D injuries. However, I think this article is missing key data and that this calls into question the authors' central conclusions.
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      References

        • Morrison S.A.
        • Lorenz D.
        • Eskay C.P.
        • Forrest G.F.
        • Basso D.M.
        Longitudinal recovery and reduced costs after 120 sessions of locomotor training for motor incomplete spinal cord injury.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018; 99: 555-562
        • Wallach J.D.
        • Gonsalves G.S.
        • Ross J.S.
        Research, regulatory, and clinical clinical decision-making: the importance of scientific integrity.
        J Clin Epidemiol. 2018; 93: 88-93