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Rasch Analyses of the Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for Power Wheelchair Users

  • Brodie M. Sakakibara
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Rehabilitation Research Program, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • William C. Miller
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Research Program, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Department of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Paula W. Rushton
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author Paula W. Rushton, PhD, Marie Enfant Rehabilitation Center, CHU Saint Justine Research Centre, 5200 Belanger St., Montréal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C9.
    Affiliations
    School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Marie Enfant Rehabilitation Center, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Jan Miller Polgar
    Affiliations
    School of Occupational Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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Published:September 27, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2017.09.004

      Abstract

      Objectives

      To examine the dimensionality of the Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for power wheelchair users (WheelCon-P), to identify items that do not fit the Rasch rating scale model as well as redundant items for elimination, and to determine the SEMs and reliability estimates for the entire range of measurements.

      Design

      Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data.

      Setting

      Community.

      Participants

      Volunteer participants (N=189) using wheelchairs (mean age of the sample, 56.7±13.0y; mean years of wheelchair use experience, 20.4±16.4).

      Interventions

      Not applicable.

      Main Outcome Measures

      59-Item WheelCon-P.

      Results

      Principal component analyses confirmed the presence of 2 self-efficacy dimensions: mobility and social situation. Eleven mobility items and 5 social situation items fit the Rasch rating scale model. Three items misfit the model using all 16 items (ie, WheelCon-P short form). In each of the mobility, social situation, and WheelCon-P short form range of measurements, the 2 lowest and 2 highest measures had internal consistency reliability estimates below .70; all other measures had reliability estimates above .70.

      Conclusions

      The WheelCon-P is composed of 2 self-efficacy dimensions related to mobility and social situations. The scores from the WheelCon-P short form and the 11-item mobility and 5-item social situation dimensions using a 0 to 10 response scale have good reliability.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      PCA (principal component analysis), WheelCon-M (Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for manual wheelchair users), WheelCon-P (Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for power wheelchair users)
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