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Balance Confidence: A Predictor of Perceived Physical Function, Perceived Mobility, and Perceived Recovery 1 Year After Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

  • Caryne Torkia
    Affiliations
    Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Krista L. Best
    Affiliations
    Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • William C. Miller
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author William C. Miller, PhD, FCAOT, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, T325-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5.
    Affiliations
    Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Janice J. Eng
    Affiliations
    Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada

    Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
Published:April 05, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.03.004

      Abstract

      Objective

      To estimate the effect of balance confidence measured at 1 month poststroke rehabilitation on perceived physical function, mobility, and stroke recovery 12 months later.

      Design

      Longitudinal study (secondary analysis).

      Setting

      Multisite, community-based.

      Participants

      Community-dwelling individuals (N=69) with stroke living in a home setting.

      Interventions

      Not applicable.

      Main Outcome Measures

      Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale; physical function and mobility subscales of the Stroke Impact Scale 3.0; and a single item from the Stroke Impact Scale for perceived recovery.

      Results

      Balance confidence at 1 month postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation predicts perceived physical function (model 1), mobility (model 2), and recovery (model 3) 12 months later after adjusting for important covariates. The covariates included in model 1 were age, sex, basic mobility, and depression. The covariates selected for model 2 were age, sex, balance capacity, and anxiety, and the covariates in model 3 were age, sex, walking capacity, and social support. The amount of variance in perceived physical function, perceived mobility, and perceived recovery that balance confidence accounted for was 12%, 9%, and 10%, respectively.

      Conclusions

      After discharge from inpatient rehabilitation poststroke, balance confidence predicts individuals' perceived physical function, mobility, and recovery 12 months later. There is a need to address balance confidence at discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      6MWT (6-minute walk test), ABC (Activities-specific Balance Confidence), ADL (activities of daily living), IADL (instrumental activities of daily living), ISEL (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List), SF-36 (36-Item Short Form Health Survey), SIS (Stroke Impact Scale)
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