Whole-Body and Local Muscle Vibration Immediately Improve Quadriceps Function in Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

  • Derek N. Pamukoff
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author Derek N. Pamukoff, PhD, Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831.
    Affiliations
    Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA

    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Brian Pietrosimone
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Michael D. Lewek
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Division of Physical Therapy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Eric D. Ryan
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • Paul S. Weinhold
    Affiliations
    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Department of Orthopedics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill and Raleigh, NC
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  • Dustin R. Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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  • J. Troy Blackburn
    Affiliations
    Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

    Department of Orthopedics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
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Published:February 08, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.01.021

      Abstract

      Objective

      To determine the immediate effects of a single session of whole-body vibration (WBV) and local muscle vibration (LMV) on quadriceps function in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR).

      Design

      Singe-blind, randomized crossover trial.

      Setting

      Research laboratory.

      Participants

      Population-based sample of individuals with ACLR (N=20; mean age ± SD, 21.1±1.2y; mean mass ± SD, 68.3±14.9kg; mean time ± SD since ACLR, 50.7±21.3mo; 14 women; 16 patellar tendon autografts, 3 hamstring autografts, 1 allograft).

      Interventions

      Participants performed isometric squats while being exposed to WBV, LMV, or no vibration (control). Interventions were delivered in a randomized order during separate visits separated by 1 week.

      Main Outcome Measures

      Quadriceps active motor threshold (AMT), motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) amplitude, peak torque (PT), rate of torque development (RTD), electromyographic amplitude, and central activation ratio (CAR) were assessed before and immediately after a WBV, LMV, or control intervention.

      Results

      There was an increase in CAR (+4.9%, P=.001) and electromyographic amplitude (+16.2%, P=.002), and a reduction in AMT (–3.1%, P<.001) after WBV, and an increase in CAR (+2.7%, P=.001) and a reduction in AMT (–2.9%, P<.001) after LMV. No effect was observed after WBV or LMV in H-reflex, RTD, or MEP amplitude. AMT (–3.7%, P<.001), CAR (+5.7%, P=.005), PT (+.31Nm/kg, P=.004), and electromyographic amplitude ( P=.002) in the WBV condition differed from the control condition postapplication. AMT (–3.0% P=.002), CAR (+3.6%, P=.005), and PT (+.30Nm/kg, P=.002) in the LMV condition differed from the control condition postapplication. No differences were observed between WBV and LMV postapplication in any measurement.

      Conclusions

      WBV and LMV acutely improved quadriceps function and could be useful modalities for restoring quadriceps strength in individuals with knee pathologies.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      ACLR ( anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction), AMT ( active motor threshold), CAR ( central activation ratio), CI ( confidence interval), ES ( effect size), H-reflex ( Hoffmann reflex), LMV ( local muscle vibration), MEP ( motor-evoked potential), MVIC ( maximal voluntary isometric contraction), PT ( peak torque), RTD ( rate of torque development), VT ( vibration therapy), WBV ( whole-body vibration)
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