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Influence of the Number of Predicted Words on Text Input Speed in Participants With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

  • Samuel Pouplin
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author Samuel Pouplin, OT, MSc, Plate-Forme Nouvelles Technologies, Service de Médecine Physique et Réadaptation, Hôpital R. Poincaré, 104 boulevard R. Poincaré, 92380 Garches, France.
    Affiliations
    New Technologies Plate-Form, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France

    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France

    Inserm Unit 1179, Team 3: Technologies and Innovative Therapies Applied to Neuromuscular Diseases, University of Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France

    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Nicolas Roche
    Affiliations
    Inserm Unit 1179, Team 3: Technologies and Innovative Therapies Applied to Neuromuscular Diseases, University of Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France

    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France

    Physiology–Functional Testing Ward, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Isabelle Vaugier
    Affiliations
    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Antoine Jacob
    Affiliations
    New Technologies Plate-Form, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Marjorie Figere
    Affiliations
    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Sandra Pottier
    Affiliations
    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
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  • Jean-Yves Antoine
    Affiliations
    University François Rabelais of Tours, Tours, France
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  • Djamel Bensmail
    Affiliations
    New Technologies Plate-Form, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France

    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France

    Inserm Unit 1179, Team 3: Technologies and Innovative Therapies Applied to Neuromuscular Diseases, University of Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France

    Clinical Innovations Center 1429, Public Hospitals of Paris, Raymond Poincaré Teaching Hospital, Garches, France
    Search for articles by this author
Published:October 22, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2015.10.080

      Abstract

      Objectives

      To determine whether the number of words displayed in the word prediction software (WPS) list affects text input speed (TIS) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and whether any influence is dependent on the level of the lesion.

      Design

      A cross-sectional trial.

      Setting

      A rehabilitation center.

      Participants

      Persons with cervical SCI (N=45). Lesion level was high (C4 and C5, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade A or B) for 15 participants (high-lesion group) and low (between C6 and C8, ASIA grade A or B) for 30 participants (low-lesion group).

      Intervention

      TIS was evaluated during four 10-minute copying tasks: (1) without WPS (Without); (2) with a display of 3 predicted words (3Words); (3) with a display of 6 predicted words (6Words); and (4) with a display of 8 predicted words (8Words).

      Main Outcome Measures

      During the 4 copying tasks, TIS was measured objectively (characters per minute, number of errors) and subjectively through subject report (fatigue, perception of speed, cognitive load, satisfaction).

      Results

      For participants with low-cervical SCI, TIS without WPS was faster than with WPS, regardless of the number of words displayed (P<.001). For participants with high-cervical SCI, the use of WPS did not influence TIS (P=.99). There was no influence of the number of words displayed in a word prediction list on TIS; however, perception of TIS differed according to lesion level.

      Conclusions

      For persons with low-cervical SCI, a small number of words should be displayed, or WPS should not be used at all. For persons with high-cervical SCI, a larger number of words displayed increases the comfort of use of WPS.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association), SCI (spinal cord injury), TIS (text input speed), VAS (visual analog scale), WPS (word prediction software)
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