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Measurement Characteristics and Clinical Utility of the Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Measure (39- and 8-item versions) in Individuals With Parkinson Disease

      The Parkinson’s Disease Quality of Life questionnaire is a self-report instrument used to assess health-related quality of life in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD).1 The instrument assesses quality of life across 8 domains: mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being, stigma, social support, cognitive impairment, communication, and bodily discomfort. There are extensive psychometric data available for this measure, the majority of which reveal adequate to excellent validity and reliability for both the 39-item Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) summary index score and the majority of the 8 domain scores (with the notable exception of the social support domain).2-4 Domain scores are associated with larger floor and ceiling effects compared with the PDQ-39 summary index score, suggesting caution in the interpretation of individual domain scores.1 Responsiveness of the summary index score has been demonstrated with natural disease progression and with pharmacological interventions with mixed results following rehabilitation interventions.1 The use of the PDQ-39 is recommended for persons in Hoehn and Yahr stages 1 to 5. As the time required to administer the PDQ-39 (10–15min) can be long, an abbreviated 8-item version (PDQ-8) was developed.
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