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Climate Change: What Does It Mean for People With Multiple Sclerosis?

Published:January 08, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2014.10.015
      Recently, Sumowski and Leavitt
      • Sumowski J.F.
      • Leavitt V.M.
      Body temperature is elevated and linked to fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, even without heat exposure.
      demonstrated that resting body temperature in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) is in fact elevated compared with healthy controls and is strongly associated with worsened fatigue. Their findings support the body of evidence that high ambient temperatures cause an increase in body temperature, and are known then to not only trigger worsened fatigue but also to exacerbate walking difficulty
      • Romberg A.
      • Ikonen A.
      • Ruutiainen J.
      • Virtanen A.
      • Hämäläinen P.
      The effect of heat stress on physical functioning in persons with multiple sclerosis.
      and falls risk.
      • Nilsagård Y.
      • Denison E.
      • Gunnarsson L.
      • Boström K.
      Factors perceived as being related to accidental falls by persons with multiple sclerosis.
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      References

        • Sumowski J.F.
        • Leavitt V.M.
        Body temperature is elevated and linked to fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, even without heat exposure.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014; 95: 1298-1302
        • Romberg A.
        • Ikonen A.
        • Ruutiainen J.
        • Virtanen A.
        • Hämäläinen P.
        The effect of heat stress on physical functioning in persons with multiple sclerosis.
        J Neurol Sci. 2012; 319: 42-46
        • Nilsagård Y.
        • Denison E.
        • Gunnarsson L.
        • Boström K.
        Factors perceived as being related to accidental falls by persons with multiple sclerosis.
        Disabil Rehabil. 2009; 31: 1301-1310
      1. Stocker T.F. Qin D. Plattner G.K. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for policymakers. In: Climate change 2013: the physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge Univ Pr, Cambridge, New York2013: 3-29
        • Flensner G.
        • Ek A.C.
        • Söderhamn O.
        Lived experience of MS-related fatigue—a phenomenological interview study.
        Int J Nurs Stud. 2003; 40: 707-717

      Linked Article

      • The Authors Respond
        Archives of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationVol. 96Issue 3
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          We recently reported elevated body temperature and its association to fatigue in persons with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).1 The response by Mooney cites our article in support of a link between body temperature and environmental temperature that we actually did not investigate. In fact, we are currently most interested in investigating endogenous factors we believe to be related to body temperature elevations in persons with RRMS. Specifically, we are investigating a novel hypothesis of body temperature as a biomarker of inflammatory events in the brains of people with RRMS.
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