Comparison of the Test-Retest Reliability of the Balance Computerized Adaptive Test and a Computerized Posturography Instrument in Patients With Stroke

  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Chen and Lin contributed equally to this work.
    Chia-Hsin Chen
    Footnotes
    ∗ Chen and Lin contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, Graduate Institute of Neuroscience, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
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  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Chen and Lin contributed equally to this work.
    Shih-Feng Lin
    Footnotes
    ∗ Chen and Lin contributed equally to this work.
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
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  • Wan-Hui Yu
    Affiliations
    School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan
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  • Jau-Hong Lin
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Department and Graduate Institute of Neurology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
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  • Hao-Ling Chen
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author Hao-Ling Chen, PhD, School of Occupational Therapy, National Taiwan University, 4F, No.17, Xuzhou Rd, Zhongzheng Dist, Taipei City 100, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
    Affiliations
    School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan
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  • Ching-Lin Hsieh
    Affiliations
    School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan
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  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Chen and Lin contributed equally to this work.
Published:March 24, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2014.03.005

      Abstract

      Objective

      To compare the test-retest reliabilities of the scores of the Balance Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT) and the Biodex Balance System in patients with stroke.

      Design

      A repeated-measures design (at a 1-wk interval) was used to examine the test-retest reliabilities of the scores of the Balance CAT and the Biodex Balance System.

      Setting

      One rehabilitation unit in a local hospital.

      Participants

      Patients (N=50) with stroke for more than 6 months and undergoing outpatient rehabilitation completed the Balance CAT and the eyes open (EO)/closed (EC) tests, but only 17 patients finished the Limit of Stability (LOS) test because they were unable to reach all the targets.

      Interventions

      Not applicable.

      Main Outcome Measures

      The Balance CAT and 2 computerized tests of the Biodex Balance System, namely the EO/EC test and the LOS, were used to evaluate balance function.

      Results

      The test-retest reliabilities of the scores of the Balance CAT (Pearson r=.92, minimal detectable change [MDC] percent=12.8%) was excellent. Those of the EO/EC and LOS tests were poor to good (Pearson r=.56–.85, MDC%=50.8%–126.9%).

      Conclusions

      The test-retest reliabilities of the scores of the Balance CAT were sufficient for assessing balance function in patients with stroke. Moreover, the test-retest reliabilities of the scores of the Balance CAT, one of the functional balance measures, were superior to those of the Biodex Balance System, 1 type of computerized posturography instrument. Therefore, the Balance CAT may be a more reliable measure for clinicians and researchers to use in assessing the balance function of patients with stroke for more than 6 months.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      CAT ( Computerized Adaptive Test), EC ( eyes closed), EO ( eyes open), LOS ( limit of stability), MDC ( minimal detectable change), PASS ( Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients), SBM ( Smart Balance Master System), SEM ( standard error of measurement)
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