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Traumatic Brain Injury as a Chronic Health Condition

  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Both authors have made substantial contributions to the conceptualization, writing, and revision of this article and will take responsibility for the entire content.
    John D. Corrigan
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: John D. Corrigan, PhD, The Ohio State University, Dept of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wexner Medical Center, 480 Medical Center Dr, Columbus, OH 43210.
    Footnotes
    ∗ Both authors have made substantial contributions to the conceptualization, writing, and revision of this article and will take responsibility for the entire content.
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Both authors have made substantial contributions to the conceptualization, writing, and revision of this article and will take responsibility for the entire content.
    Flora M. Hammond
    Footnotes
    ∗ Both authors have made substantial contributions to the conceptualization, writing, and revision of this article and will take responsibility for the entire content.
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana University School of Medicine, and the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana, Indianapolis, IN
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    ∗ Both authors have made substantial contributions to the conceptualization, writing, and revision of this article and will take responsibility for the entire content.
Published:February 11, 2013DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2013.01.023

      Abstract

      Growing evidence indicates that multiple types of brain injury, including traumatic brain injury, are dynamic conditions that continue to change years after onset. For a subset of individuals who incur these injuries, decline occurs over time and is likely due to progressive neurodegenerative processes, comorbid conditions, aging, behavioral choices, and/or psychosocial factors. Deterioration, whether directly or indirectly associated with the original brain injury, necessitates a clinical approach as a chronic health condition, including identification of risk and protective factors, protocols for early identification, evidence-based preventive and ameliorative treatment, and training in self-management. We propose that the acknowledgment of chronic brain injury will facilitate the research necessary to provide a disease management approach.

      Keywords

      List of abbreviations:

      CBI (chronic brain injury), IOM (Institute of Medicine), TBI (traumatic brain injury)
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