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Effect of inspiratory muscle training in patients with multiple sclerosis1

      Abstract

      Klefbeck B, Hamrah Nedjad J. Effect of inspiratory muscle training in patients with multiple sclerosis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003;84:994-9.

      Objective:

      To evaluate whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves inspiratory muscle strength, respiratory capacity, fatigue, and subjective perception of physical endurance in patients with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS).

      Design:

      Randomized controlled trial.

      Setting:

      Outpatient clinic in Sweden.

      Participants:

      Fifteen severely disabled patients with MS, randomized to a training or control group.

      Intervention:

      Seven patients trained with a Threshold inspiratory muscle trainer, twice every other day, with 3 sets of 10 loaded inspirations (40%–60% of patients’ maximal inspiratory pressure [Pimax]) over a 10-week period.

      Main Outcome Measures:

      Spirometry, Pimax, maximal expiratory pressure (Pemax), clinical assessments, and questionnaires on the patients’ fatigue severity and physical endurance were evaluated.

      Results:

      After training, the Pimax (P<.008) and Pemax (P<.02) increased in the training group. The improvement in Pimax after 10 weeks of training was higher than the improvement in the control group (P<.01) and was maintained 1 month after the training period ended. The training affected neither respiratory function nor the patients’ symptoms.

      Conclusions:

      IMT had a beneficial effect on inspiratory muscle strength in patients with MS and is recommended as a complement to ordinary physical training.

      Keywords

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