Advertisement

Association of pain with employment status and satisfaction among amputees in Japan

  • Makoto Ide
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (Ide), and Industrial Rehabilitation Center for Employees, Kyushu Rosai Hospital (Obayashi, Toyonaga), Kitakyushu, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Takeharu Obayashi
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (Ide), and Industrial Rehabilitation Center for Employees, Kyushu Rosai Hospital (Obayashi, Toyonaga), Kitakyushu, Japan
    Search for articles by this author
  • Toshihiro Toyonaga
    Affiliations
    Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (Ide), and Industrial Rehabilitation Center for Employees, Kyushu Rosai Hospital (Obayashi, Toyonaga), Kitakyushu, Japan
    Search for articles by this author

      Abstract

      Ide M, Obayashi T, Toyonaga T. Association of pain with employment status and satisfaction among amputees in Japan. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2002;83:1394-8. Objective: To assess the relationship between residual and phantom limb pain and working life among persons with limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study in which amputee patients completed a mailed questionnaire about their residual limb and phantom limb pain, employment status, and satisfaction with working life. Setting: Department of rehabilitation medicine of a major hospital in Japan. Participants: All participants were registered at the industrial rehabilitation center of a general hospital in Japan. Responses were received from 101 of the 147 patients (response rate, 68.7%) who were sent the questionnaire. Intervention: An amputation pain and employment status survey that included a standardized pain measure. Main Outcome Measures: A self-report questionnaire, with 1 part concerning employment status and satisfaction with working life, and the other regarding amputation-related pain, which the participant described according to the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG). Results: We found (1) no statistically significant association between types of pain and the return to work rate, (2) no statistically significant association between the pain severity as graded by the CPG and return to work rate, and (3) satisfaction with working life was significantly related to the CPG categories. Conclusion: The severity of pain does not appear to be associated with return to work among limb amputees. However, it is associated with satisfaction with working life. Appropriate treatment of pain may therefore improve work-related satisfaction. © 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Saeki S
        • Ogata H
        • Okubo T
        • Takahashi K
        • Hoshuyama T.
        Factors influencing return to work after stroke in Japan.
        Stroke. 1993; 24: 1182-1185
        • Murphy G
        • Brown D
        • Athansou J
        • Foreman P
        • Young A.
        Labour force participation and employment among a sample of Australian patients with a spinal cord injury.
        Spinal Cord. 1997; 35: 238-244
        • Krause JS
        • Sternberg M
        • Maides J
        • Lottes S.
        Employment after spinal cord injury: differences related to geographic region, gender, and race.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998; 79: 615-624
        • Teasell RW
        • McRae MP
        • Finestone HM.
        Social issues in the rehabilitation of younger stroke patients.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000; 81: 205-209
        • Millstein S
        • Bain D
        • Hunter GA.
        A review of employment patterns of industrial amputees—factors influencing rehabilitation.
        Prosthet Orthot Int. 1985; 9: 69-78
        • Livingston DH
        • Keenan D
        • Kim D
        • Elcavage J
        • Malangoni MA.
        Extent of disability following traumatic extremity amputation.
        J Trauma. 1994; 37: 495-499
        • Schoppen T
        • Boonstra A
        • Groothoff JW
        • de Vries J
        • Goeken LN
        • Eisma WH.
        Employment status, job characteristics, and work-related health experience of people with a lower limb amputation in The Netherlands.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001; 82: 239-245
        • Jensen TS
        • Krebs B
        • Nielsen J
        • Rasmussen P.
        Immediate and long-term phantom limb pain in amputees: incidence, clinical characteristics and relationship to pre-amputation limb pain.
        Pain. 1985; 21: 267-278
        • Wartan SW
        • Hamann W
        • Wedley JR
        • McColl I.
        Phantom pain and sensation among British veteran amputees.
        Br J Anaesth. 1997; 78: 652-659
        • Smith DG
        • Ehde DM
        • Legro MW
        • Reiber GE
        • del Aguila M
        • Boone DA.
        Phantom limb, residual limb, and back pain after lower extremity amputations.
        Clin Orthop. 1999;Apr; 361: 29-38
        • Ehde DM
        • Czerniecki JM
        • Smith DG
        • et al.
        Chronic phantom sensations, phantom pain, residual limb pain, and other regional pain after lower limb amputation.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000; 81: 1039-1044
        • Von Korff M
        • Ormel J
        • Keefe FJ
        • Dworkin SF.
        Grading the severity of chronic pain.
        Pain. 1992; 50: 133-149
        • Smith BH
        • Penny KI
        • Purves AM
        • et al.
        The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire: validation and reliability in postal research.
        Pain. 1997; 71: 141-147
        • Branhölm IB
        • Eklund M
        • Fugl-Meyer AR
        • Fugl-Meyer KS.
        On work and life satisfaction.
        J Rehabil Sci. 1991; 4: 29-34
        • Fugl-Meyer AR
        • Branhölm IB
        • Fugl-Meyer KS.
        Happiness and domain-specific life satisfaction in adult northern Swedes.
        Clin Rehabil. 1991; 5: 25-33
        • Pezzin LE
        • Dillingham TR
        • Mackenzie EJ.
        Rehabilitation and long-term outcome of persons with trauma-related amputations.
        Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000; 81: 292-300