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Longer versus shorter daily constraint-induced movement therapy of chronic hemiparesis: An exploratory study

  • Annette Sterr
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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  • Thomas Elbert
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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  • Irina Berthold
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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  • Sabine Kölbel
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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  • Brigitte Rockstroh
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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  • Edward Taub
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of Liverpool, UK (Sterr); Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Germany (Elbert, Berthold, Rockstroh); Hegau Jugendwerk, Gailingen, Germany (Kölbel); and Department of Psychology, University of Alabama and Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (Taub)
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      Abstract

      Sterr A, Elbert T, Berthold I, Kölbel S, Rockstroh B, Taub E. Longer versus shorter daily constraint-induced movement therapy of chronic hemiparesis: an exploratory study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2002;83:1374-7. Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of 3-hour versus 6-hour daily training sessions in constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). Design: Intervention study, 2-group randomized trial; baseline, pretreatment, and posttreatment measures; 1-month follow-up (weekly measures). Setting: University department of psychology in Germany. Participants: A convenience sample of 15 adults with chronic hemiparesis (13 stroke, 2 traumatic brain injury). Intervention: CIMT (14 consecutive days; constraint of unaffected hand for a target of 90% of waking hours) with either 6 hours (6h/d group, n=7) or 3 hours (3h/d group, n=8) of shaping training with the affected hand per day. Main Outcome Measures: The Motor Activity Log and Wolf Motor Function Test. Results: Significant improvements in motor function in the laboratory and increased use of the affected hand in the real-world environment were found in both groups. The beneficial effects were significantly greater in the 6h/d group than in the 3h/d group. Conclusion: The 3-hour CIMT training schedule significantly improved motor function in chronic hemiparesis, but it was less effective than the 6-hour training schedule. © 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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